The Week in Early Learning

This week’s best articles about early learning from around the web – December 8, 2018 edition.

 

This December edition of The Week in Early Learning has everything from Christmas safety to studies about mental health. It’s hard to stay in the loop of what’s going on in the world of early learning. But we’ve got you covered!

Each week we will comb through the web and find the most interesting early childhood reads.

 

How to Childproof a Christmas Tree – via Fatherly

Toddlers have a natural interest in investigating and figuring things out. Which is why proofing holiday decorations like tinsel and other small objects is very important. This Fatherly blog post has great tips for making sure the season of joy stays that way for the curious learners in your household.

 

Regular bedtimes and sufficient sleep for children may lead to healthier teens – via Penn State News

You know that sleeping is important. But did you know that establishing a bedtime routine can make a big difference in the health of your child as they grow older? This research study from Penn State University looked at a diverse pool of children from different backgrounds. And the findings will inform not just how parents are enforcing bedtimes but how programs develop interventions for families that need help too.

 

Is “Pregnancy Brain” Really A Thing? New Research Suggests There Could Be A Good Reason For It – via Romper

Did you put your keys in the freezer while you were pregnant? Scientists from University of Toronto believe there is such thing as “pregnancy brain” and this Romper article will tell you all about it.

 

 

Infections May Raise The Risk Of Mental Illness In Children – via NPR

Researchers have traced a connection between some infections and mental illnesses like schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder. New research from Denmark bolsters that connection. The study shows that a wide variety of infections, even common ones like bronchitis, are linked to a higher risk of many mental illnesses in children and adolescents.

 

Previous research identified an increased risk of schizophrenia associated with being born in winter or spring and living in a high-latitude country, such as Denmark.

 

Vitamin D Deficient Newborns Have a Higher Risk of Developing Schizophrenia, Claims Study – via Technology Networks

Newborns with vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, a team of Australian and Danish researchers has reported. The discovery could help prevent some cases of the disease by treating vitamin D deficiency during the earliest stages of life.

 

Vitamin C may reduce harm to infants’ lungs caused by smoking during pregnancy – via EurikAlert!

251 pregnant women who smoked were randomly assigned at 13 to 23 weeks of gestation to either receive vitamin C. Infants whose mothers took vitamin C — in addition to their prenatal vitamin — had significantly better measures of how fast air can be exhaled from the lungs. This is an important measure of lung function because that’s how scientists detect airway obstruction.

 

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments!

 


Want to continue reading about your child’s growth? Check out these Brighter Futures Indiana blog posts:

Signs of Quality Care for Infants

13 Fun Reads for Little Dinosaur Fans

What you need to know about gestational diabetes

Health Topics: When to Keep Kids Home

Is it a cold or the flu?

 

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