The Week in Early Learning

This week’s best reads about early learning from around the web — March 22, 2019 edition.

 

It’s hard to stay in the loop of what’s going on in the world of early childhood. But we’ve got you covered!

Each week we will comb through the web and find the most interesting early childhood reads.

 

 

Be up to speed with the latest parenting style: snowplow parenting. Snowplow parenting involves parents removing obstacles for their children so they don’t have to deal with failure. But learning to handle failure is healthy for kids, and helps them grow into competent young adults. Read this article for tips.

 

 

Baby cough syrup is recalled after bacterial contamination — via CNN

The product is distributed nationwide in Dollar General retail stores and has the potential to put children at risk for two forms of gastrointestinal illness. Some of the symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. Infants, young children and others with weakened immune systems are the most at risk if exposed.

 

 

It’s not a good idea to just let your kids get chickenpox — via Popular Science

We’ve had an effective vaccine for chickenpox since 1995. Most unvaccinated kids get it at some point, and once you’ve had it you never get it again. And because of all that, you might think you should just expose your kids and get it over with. Here’s the problem: the virus that causes chickenpox isn’t totally innocuous.

 

 

Millennials, heed these pro tips for restaurant dining with your kids — via The Takeout

The Pew Research Center points out that a million millennials give birth every year. So, what should these new parents look for during meals out with small people? Read this article for toddler restaurant truths and tips.

 

Dinnertime is an opportunity for learning new words, practicing motor skills and experimenting with cause and effect.

 

 

Giving Babies Peanuts Early in Life Could Help Them Avoid Developing an Allergy, Says the AAP — via People

New guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics have revealed that giving children peanuts in infancy can help them avoid developing a related allergy. The clinical report, published this month in the group’s Pediatrics journal, debunks the commonly held belief that “delaying the introduction of allergenic foods, including peanuts, eggs and fish beyond four to six months, prevents atopic disease.”

 

 

 

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments!

 


 

Want to continue reading about your child’s growth? Check out these Brighter Futures Indiana blog posts:

BINGO! 24 Family Activities to Celebrate Spring

Princess, Poets and Pilots — In these Books, Girls are the Main Characters

What New Data Says About Indiana’s Babies and Toddlers

Games & Activities: Play and Child Development

Signs of Safe Sleep in Child Care

Little Teeth Big Smiles

Science, Spaghetti & Meatballs

Ten Ideas For Fostering Sibling Bonds

Sing, Dance & Play — The Importance of Music in Early Childhood

 

 

 

 

 

Cover image: Inuit parents tell their children to beware of the northern lights. If you don’t wear your hat in the winter, they’ll say, the lights will come, take your head and use it as a soccer ball!

Johan Hallberg-Campbell for NPR

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