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The Week in Early Learning

This week’s best reads about early learning and parenting from around the web — April 12, 2019 edition.

 

With so many news sources and new research, it’s hard to stay in the loop of what’s going on with kids these days. But we’ve got you covered!

Each week we will comb through the web and find the most interesting reads in the topics of parenthood and early childhood.

 

First-ever dietary guidelines coming for babies, given ‘life sentence’ if obese by age 5 — via USA Today 

For almost 40 years, the Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have issued dietary guidelines for the general public. Now, amid a childhood obesity epidemic in which Harvard researchers predict 57% of children today will be obese by age 35, a group has assembled to write guidelines specifically for pregnant women, infants and young children.

 

 

4 Ways Working Dads Can Make More Time for Family — via The Harvard Times

“Do dads actually care about work-life balance?” According to The Boston College Center for Work and Family, one of the few organizations focusing on the changing role dads play both at home and in the workplace, the answer is a resounding yes.

 

 

How Work-Family Justice Can Bring Balance to Scientist Moms — via Scientific American

In this opinion piece, six prominent American scientists discuss the culture and biases that keep women from full-time science jobs.

“While enacting policy is a key component of achieving equality, changing our cultural views and expectations around science careers and compatibility with motherhood needs to be part of the conversation.”

 

 

Herbals in pregnancy may endanger mom, baby — via Medical Xpress

Although the headline sounds pretty assertive, this article is an interesting look at how research leads to different outcomes. Some research is taken more seriously because of the number of people that participate in it. And because the findings are proved without a doubt. In the case of herbal remedies, the science community has a lot of information about different herbs and outcomes in pregnancy parents might want to consider before consuming herbal remedies.

 

 

The Scientific Cause of Sudden Toddler Meltdowns — via Medium

As much as it may feel like your toddler is the world’s least rational human, there are scientific reasons for this unpredictability. Understanding what’s going on in your kid’s head can help you teach them to handle their feelings—or, at the very least, keep you from ending up crying on the floor yourself.

 

 

 

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments!

 


 

Want to continue reading about your child’s growth? Check out these Brighter Futures Indiana blog posts:

Vaccines: Five Great Reasons to Vaccinate

Supporting Children With Autism: Five Things You Can Do

Protecting Little Ones From Ticks

BINGO! 24 Family Activities to Celebrate Spring

Princess, Poets and Pilots — In these Books, Girls are the Main Characters

What New Data Says About Indiana’s Babies and Toddlers

Games & Activities: Play and Child Development

Signs of Safe Sleep in Child Care

Ten Ideas For Fostering Sibling Bonds

Sing, Dance & Play — The Importance of Music in Early Childhood

 

Image by Natalie Matthews-Ramo via Slate.

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