grandma, mothers day, mother, news

The Week in Early Learning

This week’s best reads about early learning and parenting from around the web — May 10, 2019 edition.

 

With so many news sources and new research, it’s hard to stay in the loop. But we’ve got you covered! Each week we will comb through the web and find the most interesting reads in the topics of parenthood and early childhood.

 

 

Repetition Key to Fostering Healthy Eating Habits in Early Childhood — via PsychCentral

Early childhood is a critical period for establishing healthy eating behaviors, yet many preschoolers in the United States are not meeting dietary recommendations. Now, new research suggests the best way to develop healthy eating habits is to consistently expose preschoolers to healthy food choices. This allows a child to become familiar with good food without pressure.

SOS – Picky Eating: Why They Seem Picky and What To Do About It

 

 

For the past 20 years, research by the Bureau of Labor Statistics has consistently found that women employed outside of the home shoulder 65 percent of child-care responsibilities, meanwhile their male partners 35 percent.

Don’t Be Grateful That Dad Does His Share — via The Atlantic

Reports of the modern, involved father have been greatly exaggerated. As the social psychologist Bernadette Park has put it, any change “is more in ‘the culture of fatherhood’ than in actual behavior.” In 2017, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development called the uneven distribution of unpaid labor between men and women in the home one of the most important gender-equality issues of our time.

 

Parents everywhere have a new resource: NYT Parenting. The new website provides useful guidance to parents and people who are thinking about becoming parents. Additionally, NYT Parenting is making the bold choice of doing without the term “natural birth”. Many parenting blogs use the term synonymously with unmedicated birth.

 

 

How to Teach Your Kid They Don’t Have to Be Perfect at Everything — via Lifehacker

How can parents teach kids to be gentler on themselves, to embrace the messy learning process and know that they’re safe and loved? Writer Michelle Woo discusses perfectionism and how parents perpetuate it with their children. With great insights from a licensed clinical social worker who specializes in helping people overcome perfectionism, Woo explores what can be done.

“As children, we are at the mercy of our caregivers. When they are happy, they take better care of us (as a rule) and we feel safer. When they are not happy, we often feel as though there is a rupture in the relationship, either because the parent is more distant and less responsive, or maybe has a lower stress threshold, so things that normally the parent might find funny or endearing, the parent might react angrily to.” — Michelle Woo

 

 

Library of Congress Has Digitized 100 Rare and Classic Children’s Books — via Mental Floss

One hundred rare and vintage children’s books can now be read online for free via the Library of Congress’s website. The titles, all of which were published at least a century ago, were digitized in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first national Children’s Book Week.

 

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments!

 


 

Want to continue reading about your child’s growth? Check out these Brighter Futures Indiana blog posts:

  • The Great Outdoors: Books about exploring the world
  • The Week in Early Learning
  • The Week in Early Learning
  • Visiting Restaurants With Young Children
  • Swim & Water Safety for Little Learners
  • The Week in Early Learning
  • The Week in Early Learning

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *