The Week in Early Learning

This week’s best reads about early learning from around the web — May 24, 2019 edition.

 

With so many news sources and new research, it’s hard to stay in the loop. But we’ve got you covered! Each week we will comb through the web and find the most interesting reads in the topics of parenthood and early childhood.

 

 

‘For-Now Parents’ and ‘Big Feelings’: How Sesame Street Talks About Trauma — via The Atlantic

Sesame Street has been making various supplemental-resource packages for decades now. Many of the packages on the site are geared toward topics that affect every kid —healthy eating, tantrums, sharing, math. Starting in 2013, Sesame began to focus on tougher topics, starting with a package for kids whose parents are incarcerated. (All of these resources are available in both English and Spanish.) Over the past year or so, the organization has chosen three topics to focus on: family homelessness, foster care and substance abuse. Watch their latest video here:

 

Research Finds Early Childhood Education Strengthens Families — via WTTW

You know early childhood care is good for your little one and for you. But now there’s another reason for supporting early childhood care and education: New research by the University of Chicago finds that disadvantaged children who received high-quality early childhood education are reaping the benefits of that program 50 years later. These benefits are in terms of better life outcomes for them for their offspring.

 

 

Improper Use Of Car Seats For Sleeping Babies Is Dangerous: Study — via Tech Times

At least 3,700 babies die every year because of sleep-related deaths. Of those babies, approximately 348 babies died in sitting devices, which were mostly car seats. Most noteworthy, improper use of car seats was found in 90% of these cases. The majority of the sleep-related deaths in sitting devices occurred at home and under the supervision of a parent.

 

 

Reading With Toddlers Reduces Harsh Parenting, Enhances Child Behavior, Rutgers-Led Study Finds — via Rutgers

Reading books with kids prepares them for school by building language, literacy and emotional skills. However, a new study may be the first to focus on how shared reading affects parenting. Turns out, people who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and the children are less likely to be hyperactive or disruptive.

 

 

How Movement and Exercise Help Kids Learn — via Mindshift

Scientist Wendy Suzuki brings great anecdotes and research to make the case for more movement in the classroom.

 

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments!

 


 

Want to continue reading about your child’s growth? Check out these Brighter Futures Indiana blog posts:

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  • Little Lies and Books with Big Lessons in Honesty
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  • 2019 Indiana Early Literacy Firefly Award Winner Announced
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