The Week in Early Learning

This week’s best reads about early learning from around the web — June 21, 2019 edition.

 

With so many news sources and new research, it’s hard to stay in the loop. But we’ve got you covered! Each week we will comb through the web and find the most interesting reads in the topics of parenthood and early childhood.

 

Babies’ Temperament Linked to Their Gut Bacteria — via Technology Networks

Scientists in the University of Turku, Finland, discovered that the gut microbes of a 2.5-month-old infant are associated with the temperament traits manifested at six months of age. The study provides new information on the relationship between behavior and microbes. One of the findings was that greater diversity in gut bacteria is connected to having less negative emotions and fear.

 

 

How to recognize early learning challenges in kids — via Medical Xpress

Many children have difficulty with learning at some point, but those with learning disabilities often have several specific and persistent signs, which can start in preschool years. Recognizing them as soon as possible allows a child to get needed help and make better progress.

 

Every child has a unique path.
Checking on developmental milestones helps you keep them on track.

 

 

 

Bilingual kids: Foreign languages are an emerging trend in day care — via Chicago Tribune

Evidence shows people who have been bilingual since childhood have better executive function skills and that bilingualism can prevent Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of age-related brain illnesses.

 

How much empathy can I expect from a 5-year-old? — via The Washington Post

“These days, many parents are concerned about kindness. We receive many messages about how to raise our children: They should be resilient yet vulnerable, eager yet humble, kind yet cautious. Layer onto these traits how each of us was raised, and it’s no wonder that we feel as though we are parenting in a minefield, every interaction loaded with meaning and import, treading carefully and wanting to set up our children just right.”

 

Read the Brighter Futures take: Nurturing your child’s ability to understand and share the feelings of others.

 

 

 

Outdoor learning has huge benefits for children and teachers — so why isn’t it used in more schools? — via The Conversation

“Research shows that healthier and happier children do better in school, and that education is an important determinant of future health. But education is not just about lessons within the four walls of a classroom. The outdoor environment encourages skills such as problem solving and negotiating risk which are important for child development. But opportunities for children to access the natural environment are diminishing. Children are spending less time outside due to concerns over safety, traffic, crime, and parental worries.”

 

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments!

 


 

Want to continue reading about your child’s growth? Check out these Brighter Futures Indiana blog posts:

  • The Great Outdoors: Books about exploring the world
  • The Week in Early Learning
  • The Week in Early Learning
  • Visiting Restaurants With Young Children
  • Swim & Water Safety for Little Learners
  • The Week in Early Learning
  • The Week in Early Learning

 

 

 

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